Taylor council looking at changes to allow breweries and cannabis retail

first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – At a Committee of the Whole meeting, on Monday, District of Taylor Council started to look at making amendments to zoning by-laws to support Micro Breweries, Craft Distilleries, and Cannabis Retail Uses.Recently, the District has been contacted by local business investors that are showing interest in developing a small scale craft brewery within the municipality.According to District Staff, after reviewing the District’s Zoning Bylaw, it was determined that the proposed use is not permitted in any of Taylor’s commercial zones.- Advertisement -Based on the interest expressed by the proponents, Staff prepared a proposal of zoning by-law amendments. Also while looking at changing the zoning by-laws for breweries, Staff also prepared a proposal for zoning by-laws surrounding the sale of cannabis.Based on these proposals, Council plans to seek feedback from the community in May before proceeding with any final decisions.The Cannabis Retail amendments proposed to the District of Taylor’s Zoning Bylaw are modelled closely after those adopted by the City of Fort St John.Advertisement Currently, the District by-laws do not support the sale of cannabis.For more information on the proposal of zoning by-law amendments, you can visit the District of Taylor’s website.last_img read more

America’s kids sleep-deprived

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) – America is raising a nation of sleep-deprived kids, with only 20 percent getting the recommended nine hours of shuteye on school nights and more than one in four reporting dozing off in class. Many are arriving late to school because of oversleeping and others are driving drowsy, according to a poll released Tuesday by the National Sleep Foundation. “In the competition between the natural tendency to stay up late and early school start times, a teen’s sleep is what loses out,” said Jodi A. Mindell of St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “Sending students to school without enough sleep is like sending them to school without breakfast. Sleep serves not only a restorative function for adolescents’ bodies and brains, but it is also a key time when they process what they’ve learned during the day.” said Mindell, associate director of the Sleep Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. School-age children and teenagers should get at least nine hours of sleep a day, according to the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health. The poll found that sixth-graders were sleeping an average of 8.4 hours on school nights and 12th-graders just 6.9 hours. Without enough sleep, a person has trouble focusing and responding quickly, according to NIH. The agency said there is growing evidence linking a chronic lack of sleep with an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and infections. The poll, taken in November, interviewed 1,602 adult caregivers and their children age 11 to 17. It had a margin of error of 2.4 percentage points. Among the findings: -Some 28 percent of high-school students said they fell asleep in class at least once a week. In addition, 22 percent dozed off doing homework and 14 percent arrive late or miss school because they oversleep. -Some 51 percent of adolescent drivers have been on the road while drowsy in the past year. -Four-fifths of students who get the recommended amount of sleep are achieving As and Bs in school; those who get less sleep are more likely to get lower grades. -Some 28 percent of adolescents say they are too tired to exercise. -Just 20 percent of adolescents said they get nine hours of sleep on school nights and 45 percent reported sleeping less than eight hours. “We call on parents, educators and teenagers themselves to take an active role in making sleep a priority,” said Richard L. Gelula, the foundation’s chief executive officer. Nearly all youngsters – 97 percent – have at least one electronic item in their bedroom. These include television, computer, phone or music devices. Adolescents with four or more such items in their bedrooms are much more likely than their peers to get an insufficient amount of sleep at night and almost twice as likely to fall asleep in school and while doing homework, the foundation reported. According to the NIH, sleep needs vary from person to person and change throughout life. For example, newborns sleep 16 hours to 18 hours a day; children in preschool sleep between 10 hours and 12 hours a day; school-age children and teenagers should get at least nine hours of sleep a day. Adults should get seven hours to eight hours of sleep each day. The foundation describes itself as an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public health and safety by studying sleep and sleep disorders. It is funded by memberships, sales of educational materials, advertising, investment income, individual donations, subscriptions, and educational grants from foundations, federal agencies and corporations, including pharmaceutical companies. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

ANYONE LOSE A BOAT?

first_imgA small sailing boat has drifted on to the shore on Mulroy Bay.Reader Patrick McGinley sent us this picture this evening.“It’s in need of rescuing before the weather changes,” he said. “Perhaps some DD readers knows the owner?”Over to you! ANYONE LOSE A BOAT? was last modified: October 24th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ANYONE LOSE A BOAT?last_img

DONEGAL RETREAT WINS GEORGINA CAMPBELL ‘FARMHOUSE OF THE YEAR’ AWARD

first_imgThe stunning Trean HouseA Co Donegal guesthouse has won a prestigious award and named Farmhouse of the Year.Trean House in Inishowen scooped th prize in the 2016 Georgina Campbell Award.These are Ireland’s longest-running food and hospitality awards, and highly respected by the industry. Every year Georgina Campbell and her team of experienced assessors comb the country’s hotels, country houses, guesthouses, restaurants, pubs, cafés and speciality food shops seeking out the best food and hospitality experiences for readers of The Guide (‘the glovebox bible’) and followers of the very successful website, www.ireland-guide.com.Speaking about the ongoing search for excellence, Ms Campbell said, “Our programme of anonymous assessment visits has continued throughout the season as usual, always keeping a sharp eye out for those exceptional establishments which are right on top of their game and going the extra mile for customers.“Once again this year, we have found plenty of new ones worthy of recommendation, especially in urban areas, and it is always exciting to see newcomers to the hospitality industry who understand the importance of standards and want visitors – domestic and from abroad – to enjoy Irish food and hospitality at its best. We are not seeking perfection but hospitality with real heart, and we’re finding it in clusters of excellence all over the country.Proprietors Joyce and Mervyn Norris said “We’re absolutely delighted to win this prestigious award. It’s one thing to be part of such a distinguished guide, but to win our category is a real honour. It’s wonderful to be listed up there with some of the best establishments in the country. ” Established 20 years ago in 1995, Joyce and Mervyn have been welcoming guests from all around the world and are actively involved with promoting local tourism.Reflecting on the changes in the industry over the past 20 years, Joyce said “We started B&B in 1995 as a way to diversify our farm income. There have been opportunities with the growth of the internet and increased spending power, but we’ve also faced increased competition from hotel rooms, holiday homes and more B&B properties. It’s refreshing to know that providing a warm welcome and the personal touch will always win in the end.”Joyce feels publications like Georgina Campbell’s Ireland guide are important to the industry, as they provide an respected, independent voice that people can trust:“In an age where there’s so much choice, Georgina Campbell’s Ireland guide is more relevant than ever, providing authentic, trustworthy recommendations on the best of what Ireland has to offer.”Unlike most other award schemes, the Georgina Campbell Awards are not commercially driven, there is no charge to establishments for recommendation or any element of the awards process. It is this independence which has earned them special respect in the industry, and public trust. This is what the judges had to say about our own Trean House.FARMHOUSE OF THE YEAR 2016Georgina Campbell Guide Awards 2016, held at the Bord Bia offices, Dublin.Trean House, Inishowen.“The idea of a farm stay is heaven to many visitors to Ireland, and to families living in cities. An engaging rural experience is what visitors to Joyce and Mervyn Norris’s welcoming coastal farm can be sure of, and what a treat that is.Ironically some technical detail has excluded them from the Wild Atlantic Way, but the Atlantic is there alright, just a few yards away, and- if you are lucky- you can enjoy the changing light on the sea while you watch the locals playing football on their beachside pitch.Warm hospitality, good home baking, an open fire, lovely gardens and simple, immaculately clean accommodation and local knowledge is what Joyce and Mervyn enjoy giving to their guests – and if that isn’t authentic I don’t know what is.”DONEGAL RETREAT WINS GEORGINA CAMPBELL ‘FARMHOUSE OF THE YEAR’ AWARD was last modified: October 5th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Georgina CampbellTrean Houselast_img read more

Video: Kevin Pillar hits Giants’ first grand slam since April 7, 2017

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO–Sunday, April 7 marked the two-year anniversary of the Giants’ last grand slam.It was also the three-year anniversary since the last grand slam hit by a Giants player at Oracle Park.With one violent swing of the bat, new Giants outfielder Kevin Pillar brought an end to those droughts. In the fourth inning of the Giants’ series-opener with the Padres, Pillar crushed a 419-foot grand slam halfway up the left field bleachers.KEVIN. PILLAR. GRAND. SLAM. pic.twitter.com/OrhejnHBuC …last_img

HIV/Aids: things we should know

first_img1 December 2005A major new study on HIV/Aids makes a number of findings that South Africans should know about. These include findings on how pregnancy, breastfeeding and male circumcision can affect HIV transmission, and on the importance of periodic HIV testing.But the key finding is this: if you think that you, or your children, are not at risk of contracting HIV, the chances are you’re wrong.Aids ‘starting to level off’HIV prevalence among South Africans aged 15-49 increased only slightly from 2002 to 2005, a sign that the epidemic in SA may have started levelling off, according the HSRC study.The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) published its 2005 national household survey on HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication on Wednesday ahead of World Aids Day on 1 December.The study, which estimates that 10.8% of South Africans are HIV-positive, found that young South African women, and people in poorer communities, are particularly vulnerable to HIV/Aids – but that South Africans in general fail to appreciate the risks posed by the epidemic.Key findingsKey findings of the report, all of which have implications for HIV/Aids communication campaigns in South Africa, include the following:South Africans suffer from a “false sense of security” regarding HIV/Aids.The stigma attached to HIV/Aids is becoming less of a factor in South Africa.There is an increased risk of contracting HIV during pregnancy.Periodic HIV testing is crucial to HIV/Aids prevention and treatment.HIV prevalance among children is significant, and affected both by prolonged breastfeeding of infants and poor supervision of children.Sex at a young age, high partner turnover and concurrent sexual partnerships are significant factors in HIV transmission in South Africa.Safe male circumcision offers significant, but not complete, protection.False sense of securityHalf of the respondents in the study who were found to be HIV-positive – over two million people – did not think they were at risk of HIV infection, and hence were unaware of their risk of infecting others.The study recommends that HIV/Aids campaigns and programmes address “this false sense of security in the general population, with a particular emphasis on encouraging people to go for voluntary testing and counselling”.Aids stigma on the decreaseThe survey found that an overwhelming majority of South African are willing to care for an Aids patient, and that nearly half of South Africans of 15 years and older do not think it is wrong to marry a person with HIV.“These results suggest that South Africans are accepting HIV/Aids as a reality in South Africa, and that stigmatisation in society is becoming less of a factor, especially in urban areas.” The study recommends that service providers capitalise on this by encouraging people to undergo counselling and testing, and to disclose their HIV status to their partners.Increased risk during pregnancyThe study confirmed recent findings from other studies that suggest an increased risk of HIV acquisition during pregnancy, and recommends that awareness campaigns aimed at pregnant women and would-be parents be undertaken on a national scale.These campaigns, the report said, should encourage people to plan their pregnancy, to get tested for HIV before trying to conceive, and to disclose their results to their partners.Periodic HIV testing crucialDespite a well-established voluntary counselling and testing service in South Africa, and despite the fact that most respondents in the survey knew of a place to be tested, many of those found to be HIV-positive had not been tested.“Knowledge of HIV status is a critical aspect of prevention as it is linked to motivation to prevent HIV infection of others,” the report said. “It also serves as an entree into seeking treatment for opportunistic infections and receiving antiretrovirals in the case of advanced HIV infection.”The study recommends encouraging periodic HIV testing for men and women in stable partnerships. It adds that, given the extremely high HIV incidence among South African women aged 15-24, Aids campaigns and programmes “should sensitise this young female group to the fact that the risk of HIV is real”.HIV among childrenWhile the survey recorded a substantially lower HIV prevalence among children aged 2-14 (3.3% in 2005 compared to 5.6% in 2002), the epidemic remains “significant” among South African children, with an estimated 5.1% of children aged 2-4 and 4.4% of children aged 5-9 living with HIV.Most of the HIV-positive children aged 2-4 years are likely to have been infected “through mother-to-child transmission or during prolonged breastfeeding,” the HSRC said.However, the study also found that 6% of all recent HIV infections in South Africa occurred in children aged 2-14, with 3.3% occurring in children aged 5-9. “These infections cannot be clearly linked to mother-to-child transmission, and could include child sexual abuse or infection through the healthcare system.“Other findings suggest that many South African children are left unsupervised for much of the time, including going to and from school and being sent on errands alone – practices which could expose children to sexual abuse.”The study recommends that HIV prevention campaigns include messages on increasing supervision of children. It also recommends that the government review its “baby friendly” breastfeeding policy, encouraging HIV-positive women not to breastfeed their children but to supply them with a breast milk substitute instead.Sexual lifestyle issuesA high number of sexual partners, regular turnover of sexual partners, and concurrent sexual partnerships pose significant risks for HIV infection. Over a quarter of South African men aged 15-24 had more than one partner in the past 12 months, the study found.The study also found that young South African women are more likely to have male partners who are at least five years older. “Older men have a higher HIV prevalence than younger men, and therefore young women with older male partners increase their chances of getting HIV.”The study recommends that prevention campaigns and programmes emphasise these aspects of risk, and that sexually active people should:Avoid engaging in unprotected sex with anyone whose HIV status they do not know.Access and consistently use condoms to protect themselves in every sexual encounter with non-regular partners.Avoid frequent partner turnover and concurrent sexual partnerships.Older people also at riskA high HIV prevalence among South Africans aged 50 years and older (5.8%) calls for the development of targeted interventions for this age group, the study finds, “as they are considerably less aware of national HIV/Aids campaigns and programmes and have generally poorer knowledge of key aspects of HIV prevention and other aspects of HIV/Aids”.Safe male circumcisionA recent study in Orange Farm in Gauteng found that safe male circumcision can offer males at least 60% protection from HIV infection.The HSRC study recommends that safe male circumcision be encouraged by the public health sector, medical insurance schemes and women as one effective way of slowing the spread of HIV infection.At the same time, the study warns that male circumcision does not completely prevent HIV acquisition, and that it remains crucial for circumcised men to practise safe sex.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

SA condemns chemical weapons in Syria

first_img22 March 2013 South Africa has condemned the reported use of chemical weapons in the civil war in Syria earlier this week. “The alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria is of serious concern and would introduce an extremely dangerous element into the conflict, which is wholly unacceptable by any standard,” International Relations and Cooperation Deputy Minister Ebrahim Ebrahim said in a statement on Thursday. It was reported earlier this week that a missile containing a chemical substance was fired into a village in Allepo province, killing 31 people and injuring 100. Ebrahim said South Africa was “gravely concerned” about the serious escalation of the conflict in Syria. “We have consistently called on all the parties to the conflict to stop the violence as well as protect the rights of the Syrian population.” He said that since the beginning of the Syrian crisis, South Africa had condemned the abuse of human rights, in particular violations of the rights of vulnerable groups such as women and children. Weapons of mass destruction were particularly heinous because they targeted innocent civilians. All the parties to the current conflict had a responsibility to protect and preserve human rights. “South Africa reaffirms its commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of Syria. There is no military solution to the conflict,” Ebrahim said. “The only way to stop the further destruction of Syrian society is for the parties to come together in dialogue without delay.” He said any political transition needed to reflect the will of the Syrian people, adding that South Africa rejected any calls for forced regime change and outside military interference, or any action not in line with the Charter of the United Nations. “South Africa calls for restraint on the part of all parties to the conflict, and again emphasises the need for an immediate political settlement as expressed by the Geneva Joint Communique.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

South Africa’s shoe-shine king

first_img18 December 2015“We’re the biggest shoe-shine company in Africa,” says Lere Mgayiya, the founder of Lere’s Shoe Shine Experience, which operates in three major South African airports, in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.Shoe-shine king Lere Mgayiya: a home-grown success story http://t.co/fA3p8DM4kg pic.twitter.com/ceQakIJIC3— Destiny Man (@Destiny_Man) July 14, 2015But starting a business wasn’t easy, Mgayiya says. A former South African Airways employee, he is a serial entrepreneur who started up several small businesses that were unsuccessful. In his life, Mgayiya has sold produce – he sold eggs to the Parliament canteen – as well as worked with livestock; he has also had a public mobile phone business and dabbled in stock market investment.Ultimately, those efforts proved fruitless. “I was considered a loser by my peers and family because I resigned from SAA and the money I invested was gone. That created a lot of pressure for me to look for a job. But I did not want to do that because it is not who I am at all,” Mgayiya says.In 2002, inspired by an article about a local shoe shiner, he invested in the man’s business. He also added its unique selling point – the airport locations.Lere’s Shoe Shine at OR Tambo are fantastic! Love these guys. Please support them they do a fantastic job! @pavlobiz pic.twitter.com/L222P8ufAL— Aki Anastasiou (@AkiAnastasiou) November 11, 2014Having worked in airports before, he understood that passenger traffic passing through would make it a strategic location for his service. He used his connections to negotiate a deal to operate at Cape Town International Airport. The company, initially named Airport Shoe Shine, started off slow but steady. Mgayiya sold most of his valuables to invest in his first luxury shiner’s chair and the company’s single employee.“We worked 18 hours a day, six days a week,” he remembers, with the hard work paying off in a substantial profit in the first two months, money he invested back into the company. With two more chairs and more shiners, the business soared.The company’s biggest break was when it received authorisation to open at OR Tambo International, South Africa’s largest airport, where the shiners became a popular feature for travelling businesspeople.Mgayiya partnered with Airports Company South Africa (Acsa), which operates the airports in the country, in his inevitable, unconventional way.“I had read about Acsa looking to encourage businesses within the airport and one day saw the chief executive walking around the Cape Town terminal. I walked up and told her how well she was doing; how I could see how she had turned the business around because I was at the airport every day. And she was so impressed that she asked me why I had not expanded to Johannesburg.”The rest is history.In 2008, the business expanded to OR Tambo and Durban’s King Shake airports and soon after into five other airports around South Africa. However, the stress of running eight detached locations on a limited budget led Mgayiya to close some and focus on the major airports in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban.“We learnt our lesson. We expanded too quickly to inappropriate places, which almost killed our business. We had to kill those operations fast before they killed us,” Mgayiya says.But as these three continue to gain more customers, Lere’s Shoe Shine is now eyeing expansion again. This time, though, the business is looking to go global, with plans for partnerships in the US and UK, as well as in the rest of Africa.@pavlobiz @Radio702 staff treated to shoe shine from Elliot for Lere’s Shoe Shine @BDO_SA for the 1st #CEOSleepoutZA pic.twitter.com/wvfFQvTxt7— mich (@michalentweet) May 5, 2015Mgayiya’s business philosophy is simple: passion and clever thinking are more important to entrepreneurs than just money. The business’s customers – be they tourists arriving in South Africa for the first time or seasoned business travellers – always enjoy having someone to talk to. “They enjoy the experience of interacting with (the shoe shiner), (so all my) employees have extrovert personalities“They’re someone to connect with, talk to, when you’re far from home in a hard, cold place like an airport, it’s nice to find a quiet, relaxed space for a chance to stop and relax for a moment and maybe engage meaningfully with someone that you might not have met in any other situation. That’s what this business is really about, everything else will follow if you engage with the client.”Today, Mgayiya has 45 employees and he estimates his company shines the shoes of between 120 000 and 130 000 customers a year.His advice to budding entrepreneurs is to be prepared to commit themselves completely to their business, even if it means facing greater risks. “If you are not invested in that business, it changes the chances of success.”He firmly believes that good businesses are made from good ideas, from your head and heart. “It is the driving force which is generated from the love and passion for those ideas that makes it successful – it is not just the money,” Mgayiya says.“No matter how poor you are, no matter where you come from in life. it is your brain that makes you successful and your heart that drives you.”Source: AFKInsiderlast_img read more

First generation corn borer management in non-Bt corn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest European corn borer (ECB) was once our most important corn insect, but its population has decreased over the past 20 years, likely due to Bt-corn that provides excellent protection. For this and other various reasons, many farms have switched to corn that does not contain Bt proteins to control ECB and other caterpillar pests. Keep in mind that ECB is not an extinct species — we can find ECB still flying around. This year, we have seen ECB feeding in conventional corn.ECB has two generations per year. Currently, we are seeing larval feeding on the leaves and in the whorl. Soon, and if not already, these larvae will tunnel through the stalk where they will usually continue to feed and pupate. Adults will emerge in late July-early August.Growers of conventional corn should inspect their fields for the characteristic shot hole damage (see figure). If found, you may see larvae feeding in the whorl—you may need to pull the whorl out of a couple of damaged plants to check. Although challenging, larvae in the whorl that are in the third instar or less (usually no bigger than half an inch) are still vulnerable to insecticide application.If the larvae are not in the whorl, they may have died, or worse, tunneled in the stalk. Look for the appearance of sawdust like frass, which ECB larvae leave on the outside while tunneling. Once they bore into the stalk, then control is difficult, if not impossible.As a guide, we recommend treatment for first generation ECB when 75%  to 80% of the corn shows shot hole damage, and that larvae can be seen in the whorl (i.e. have not bored into the stalk). There are many chemicals that can control ECB (see our bulletin: https://agcrops.osu.edu/publications/control-insect-pests-field-crops-bulletin-545), although granular forms tend to be more effective than liquid.last_img read more

FAA Pondering Gate-To-Gate Policy For Gadgets On Airplanes

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#smartphones#tablets dan rowinski Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Soon, you may not have to stow that gadget when you’re on an airplane waiting to take off. A forthcoming report from a Federal Aviation Administration working group will likely recommend lifting the ban on the use of electronic devices during takeoff and landing.According to The Wall Street Journal, the report will recommend the allowance of “gate to gate” gadget use, meaning you won’t have to pack away that book you are reading on your iPad or Kindle after you have taken your seat on an airplane. This will be a massive departure from almost the last 50 years of FAA policy that banned the use of electronic devices on flights fearing that emissions from the devices would play havoc with airplanes navigation instruments.The report will specifically address the use of devices in low-altitude situations (below 10,000 feet) and recommend that they be used in “airplane mode.” Cellular phone calls will still likely be prohibited during take off and landing.Gadgets are much different now than when the policy was created in 1966. The emissions from devices’ internal components are drastically less then they used to be – even from five to ten years ago – and wireless transmissions are now confined to defined, narrow spectrums.The report will likely recommend three types of gadget regulations in place of the current ban during takeoff and landing based on the type and age of the aircraft and how well it has met certain regulations. Older aircraft with limited protections will continue with a similar pre-flight announcement that flyers are used to hearing, telling them when it is OK to switch on their devices. On the other end of the spectrum, planes that have met all safety regulations will announce that, “This aircraft tolerates emissions from electrical devices for all phases of flight.” Other planes will allow gate-to-gate use of gadgets unless specifically told not to do so by the flight crew.The report will urge the FAA to set standards that new planes be able to handle most, if not all, gadget use by 2015.Top image courtesy Shutterstock.last_img read more

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