Redknapp: ‘Ditch the old guard and let England’s young stars shine at Euro 2016’

first_imgHarry Redknapp has called for Roy Hodgson to ditch England’s old guard and give the nation’s up-and-coming stars the chance to shine at next summer’s European Championships.A young Three Lions side comfortably beat Lithuania 3-0 on Monday night to ensure they finished their Euro 2016 qualification campaign with a flawless 100 per cent record.With injuries to a number of regular first-team players restricting his options, Hodgson’s starting XI for the Vilnius clash shared a total of just 140 caps between them.Captain for the evening Phil Jagielka was the oldest player in a white shirt at 33-years-old, with the likes of Ross Barkley, Harry Kane, Jonjo Shelvey, Jack Butland, Dele Alli and Danny Ings, all under 23, getting minutes.While inexperienced at international level, Tottenham striker Kane, Everton ‘diamond’ Barkley and Swansea playmaker Shelvey in particular have all impressed for their clubs over the past few years and established themselves as regulars in the Premier League.And, with the heroes of the previous ‘golden generation’ now out of the frame, Redknapp believes England boss Hodgson should begin build his team around his starlets.Speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast, he said: “We’re in a situation now where we’ve gone tournament after tournament and experienced disappointment after disappointment – let’s give some of the young lads a go now.“Let’s give players like 19-year-old Dele Alli a chance. He’s only just broken into Tottenham’s first-team, but he looks a real talent and he’s got a bright future.“We’ve gone with the old guard year after year, so I’d love to see us throw a few of the kids in there and get some experience at the top level.“If we go to the Euros and we don’t make it to the later stages, at least it would be a great experience for them, and they’ll come back ready to go again when the World Cup comes around.“There have been a lot of good positives [from their qualifying campaign]. Some good young players have broken through, so that’s got to be good for England.“Roy has a good young group of players, it’s encouraging when you look at the team. Sterling has been in there for a few years now, we’ve got a group of young full-backs coming through and Chris Smalling has established himself as one of the central defenders.“Barkley is a real talent, too. I think he’s the kind of player you have to build the team around, he’s got fantastic ability. I hope he gets a run in the first team now. Let him have a go and see what he can do. He can be a really important player for the next eight or nine years for England.“Overall, it’s a good looking young squad of players which looks good for the future.”last_img read more

Warriors scout prospective No. 1 draft pick, who is ruled ineligible by the NCAA

first_imgWit and wisdom from Grandma Part II:Grandma said that when she met Grandpa, it was love at first sight. So dumbstruck was Grandpa that Grandma told him, “When your eyes get full, use your pockets.”Here’s hoping the Warriors brass who embarked Tuesday on a roadie to scout James Wiseman in Portland packed their pockets. CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile device Wiseman? He is a 7-1, 240-pound center, a specimen and a half who is the …last_img

HIV/Aids: things we should know

first_img1 December 2005A major new study on HIV/Aids makes a number of findings that South Africans should know about. These include findings on how pregnancy, breastfeeding and male circumcision can affect HIV transmission, and on the importance of periodic HIV testing.But the key finding is this: if you think that you, or your children, are not at risk of contracting HIV, the chances are you’re wrong.Aids ‘starting to level off’HIV prevalence among South Africans aged 15-49 increased only slightly from 2002 to 2005, a sign that the epidemic in SA may have started levelling off, according the HSRC study.The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) published its 2005 national household survey on HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication on Wednesday ahead of World Aids Day on 1 December.The study, which estimates that 10.8% of South Africans are HIV-positive, found that young South African women, and people in poorer communities, are particularly vulnerable to HIV/Aids – but that South Africans in general fail to appreciate the risks posed by the epidemic.Key findingsKey findings of the report, all of which have implications for HIV/Aids communication campaigns in South Africa, include the following:South Africans suffer from a “false sense of security” regarding HIV/Aids.The stigma attached to HIV/Aids is becoming less of a factor in South Africa.There is an increased risk of contracting HIV during pregnancy.Periodic HIV testing is crucial to HIV/Aids prevention and treatment.HIV prevalance among children is significant, and affected both by prolonged breastfeeding of infants and poor supervision of children.Sex at a young age, high partner turnover and concurrent sexual partnerships are significant factors in HIV transmission in South Africa.Safe male circumcision offers significant, but not complete, protection.False sense of securityHalf of the respondents in the study who were found to be HIV-positive – over two million people – did not think they were at risk of HIV infection, and hence were unaware of their risk of infecting others.The study recommends that HIV/Aids campaigns and programmes address “this false sense of security in the general population, with a particular emphasis on encouraging people to go for voluntary testing and counselling”.Aids stigma on the decreaseThe survey found that an overwhelming majority of South African are willing to care for an Aids patient, and that nearly half of South Africans of 15 years and older do not think it is wrong to marry a person with HIV.“These results suggest that South Africans are accepting HIV/Aids as a reality in South Africa, and that stigmatisation in society is becoming less of a factor, especially in urban areas.” The study recommends that service providers capitalise on this by encouraging people to undergo counselling and testing, and to disclose their HIV status to their partners.Increased risk during pregnancyThe study confirmed recent findings from other studies that suggest an increased risk of HIV acquisition during pregnancy, and recommends that awareness campaigns aimed at pregnant women and would-be parents be undertaken on a national scale.These campaigns, the report said, should encourage people to plan their pregnancy, to get tested for HIV before trying to conceive, and to disclose their results to their partners.Periodic HIV testing crucialDespite a well-established voluntary counselling and testing service in South Africa, and despite the fact that most respondents in the survey knew of a place to be tested, many of those found to be HIV-positive had not been tested.“Knowledge of HIV status is a critical aspect of prevention as it is linked to motivation to prevent HIV infection of others,” the report said. “It also serves as an entree into seeking treatment for opportunistic infections and receiving antiretrovirals in the case of advanced HIV infection.”The study recommends encouraging periodic HIV testing for men and women in stable partnerships. It adds that, given the extremely high HIV incidence among South African women aged 15-24, Aids campaigns and programmes “should sensitise this young female group to the fact that the risk of HIV is real”.HIV among childrenWhile the survey recorded a substantially lower HIV prevalence among children aged 2-14 (3.3% in 2005 compared to 5.6% in 2002), the epidemic remains “significant” among South African children, with an estimated 5.1% of children aged 2-4 and 4.4% of children aged 5-9 living with HIV.Most of the HIV-positive children aged 2-4 years are likely to have been infected “through mother-to-child transmission or during prolonged breastfeeding,” the HSRC said.However, the study also found that 6% of all recent HIV infections in South Africa occurred in children aged 2-14, with 3.3% occurring in children aged 5-9. “These infections cannot be clearly linked to mother-to-child transmission, and could include child sexual abuse or infection through the healthcare system.“Other findings suggest that many South African children are left unsupervised for much of the time, including going to and from school and being sent on errands alone – practices which could expose children to sexual abuse.”The study recommends that HIV prevention campaigns include messages on increasing supervision of children. It also recommends that the government review its “baby friendly” breastfeeding policy, encouraging HIV-positive women not to breastfeed their children but to supply them with a breast milk substitute instead.Sexual lifestyle issuesA high number of sexual partners, regular turnover of sexual partners, and concurrent sexual partnerships pose significant risks for HIV infection. Over a quarter of South African men aged 15-24 had more than one partner in the past 12 months, the study found.The study also found that young South African women are more likely to have male partners who are at least five years older. “Older men have a higher HIV prevalence than younger men, and therefore young women with older male partners increase their chances of getting HIV.”The study recommends that prevention campaigns and programmes emphasise these aspects of risk, and that sexually active people should:Avoid engaging in unprotected sex with anyone whose HIV status they do not know.Access and consistently use condoms to protect themselves in every sexual encounter with non-regular partners.Avoid frequent partner turnover and concurrent sexual partnerships.Older people also at riskA high HIV prevalence among South Africans aged 50 years and older (5.8%) calls for the development of targeted interventions for this age group, the study finds, “as they are considerably less aware of national HIV/Aids campaigns and programmes and have generally poorer knowledge of key aspects of HIV prevention and other aspects of HIV/Aids”.Safe male circumcisionA recent study in Orange Farm in Gauteng found that safe male circumcision can offer males at least 60% protection from HIV infection.The HSRC study recommends that safe male circumcision be encouraged by the public health sector, medical insurance schemes and women as one effective way of slowing the spread of HIV infection.At the same time, the study warns that male circumcision does not completely prevent HIV acquisition, and that it remains crucial for circumcised men to practise safe sex.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

African youth prone to saving, advancing education: Barclays report

first_img31 October 2014African youth are more likely to invest surplus cash to achieve their long-terms goals, rather than spend money on luxury items, according to a report released recently by Barclays Africa Group Limited.A result of a survey conducted among 7 052 young Africans from 11 countries, the report states that 49% of all respondents said they would invest or save an extra US$100 if they had the money.Of the total number of respondents, 14.7% said they would use the extra US$100 for education and skills-related expenses and 13.2% would use it to pay off their debt, indicating good saving intentions and a readiness to make sacrifices for education and training as a strategy for prosperity, the report notes.Young South Africans less likely to investCompared to the overall score, Ghanaians (62%) and Kenyans (63%) came out tops as the most likely nations to invest additional funds. However, South Africans were less likely to invest (27%) and were only slightly more inclined to pay off debt (31%).Entitled “Africa Prospers: Future Youth Drivers of the African Economy’, the purpose of the survey was to gauge how Africans defined “prosperity” and how they are investing for their future. Respondents from South Africa, Zambia, Botswana, Kenya, Ghana, Mozambique, Seychelles, Mauritius, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe took part in the survey from April to August this year.What it means to prosper to young AfricansYoung Africans mostly agreed that to prosper means to be successful, to thrive and to be fortunate in not only finances but also in health, career satisfaction and happiness.“The survey showed that there is a new understanding of prosperity – one that transcends the confines of traditional family or community structures,” according to the report.Of note, 30% of respondents said they would buy a computer if they had extra cash and 24% said they would purchase books in order to prosper. Education cropped up quite frequently in the survey, an indication of the zeal for knowledge among the youth.“Both the internet and new and developing mobile phone technology are increasing the importance of this generation as agents of social transformation and wealth creation in different sub-regions of Africa,’ the report notes.Lack of financeHowever, 68.9% of the participants said the major impediment to “prosperity’ was lack of finance. Half of the participants indicated there was general lack of opportunity to prosper and 26.2% said they needed financial advice.Commenting on the findings in the executive summary of the report, independent analysts Professor Monde Makiwane of the Human Sciences Research Council and Dr Golda Chimere-Dan of Africa Strategic Research Corporation (Pty) Ltd said the survey “captures the prosperity perspectives, experiences and life strategies of Africa’s growing and young emerging middle-class, who holds the key to accelerated economic growth and transformation in Africa’.“It addresses critical issues of financial behaviour and prosperity that have either been missed or poorly measured by previous social and financial surveys in Africa. Although some results from the report confirm findings from other location- specific studies, this is the first survey of its kind to collect this specific set of information in a comparative study of 11 African countries.’Findings key to attracting investment in AfricaMakiwane and Chimere-Dan said the findings will have profound implications on how economic development and financial services are packaged and presented to people in Africa in years to come.“Africa constitutes a sizeable portion of the global market with its share of general and unique risks and opportunities. Even though regional economic growth is vulnerable to the fluctuations in the global markets, many analysts remain optimistic about the economic prospects for sub Saharan Africa,’ the two analysts noted, adding that a combination of demographic and social dynamics has given rise to two notable patterns that attract regional and global attention to the African market.The first pattern shows that the current phase of the demographic transition in Africa is contributing to a growing sub-group of young, economically active Africans who are better educated and not as digitally disadvantaged as the generations that preceded them.Recent studies by demographers and economists have identified this new generation as the potential vanguard for accelerated economic growth and human development in Africa, a phenomenon is referred to as the African “youth bulge’.African youth bulgeThe second pattern relates to Africa following Asia’s saving boom. Makiwane and Chimere-Dan said several decades ago, Asia experienced a similar “youth bulge’.“Asia capitalised on this by creating employment opportunities and mobilising the youth to save, thereby boosting per capita savings. Encouragingly, one of the most significant findings from the Barclays Africa Prosper Report is the high level of savings and investments reported by participants. As many as 50% of respondents would save or invest to help them prosper financially. This needs encouragement,’ Makiwane and Chimere-Dan noted.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

South Africa’s shoe-shine king

first_img18 December 2015“We’re the biggest shoe-shine company in Africa,” says Lere Mgayiya, the founder of Lere’s Shoe Shine Experience, which operates in three major South African airports, in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.Shoe-shine king Lere Mgayiya: a home-grown success story http://t.co/fA3p8DM4kg pic.twitter.com/ceQakIJIC3— Destiny Man (@Destiny_Man) July 14, 2015But starting a business wasn’t easy, Mgayiya says. A former South African Airways employee, he is a serial entrepreneur who started up several small businesses that were unsuccessful. In his life, Mgayiya has sold produce – he sold eggs to the Parliament canteen – as well as worked with livestock; he has also had a public mobile phone business and dabbled in stock market investment.Ultimately, those efforts proved fruitless. “I was considered a loser by my peers and family because I resigned from SAA and the money I invested was gone. That created a lot of pressure for me to look for a job. But I did not want to do that because it is not who I am at all,” Mgayiya says.In 2002, inspired by an article about a local shoe shiner, he invested in the man’s business. He also added its unique selling point – the airport locations.Lere’s Shoe Shine at OR Tambo are fantastic! Love these guys. Please support them they do a fantastic job! @pavlobiz pic.twitter.com/L222P8ufAL— Aki Anastasiou (@AkiAnastasiou) November 11, 2014Having worked in airports before, he understood that passenger traffic passing through would make it a strategic location for his service. He used his connections to negotiate a deal to operate at Cape Town International Airport. The company, initially named Airport Shoe Shine, started off slow but steady. Mgayiya sold most of his valuables to invest in his first luxury shiner’s chair and the company’s single employee.“We worked 18 hours a day, six days a week,” he remembers, with the hard work paying off in a substantial profit in the first two months, money he invested back into the company. With two more chairs and more shiners, the business soared.The company’s biggest break was when it received authorisation to open at OR Tambo International, South Africa’s largest airport, where the shiners became a popular feature for travelling businesspeople.Mgayiya partnered with Airports Company South Africa (Acsa), which operates the airports in the country, in his inevitable, unconventional way.“I had read about Acsa looking to encourage businesses within the airport and one day saw the chief executive walking around the Cape Town terminal. I walked up and told her how well she was doing; how I could see how she had turned the business around because I was at the airport every day. And she was so impressed that she asked me why I had not expanded to Johannesburg.”The rest is history.In 2008, the business expanded to OR Tambo and Durban’s King Shake airports and soon after into five other airports around South Africa. However, the stress of running eight detached locations on a limited budget led Mgayiya to close some and focus on the major airports in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban.“We learnt our lesson. We expanded too quickly to inappropriate places, which almost killed our business. We had to kill those operations fast before they killed us,” Mgayiya says.But as these three continue to gain more customers, Lere’s Shoe Shine is now eyeing expansion again. This time, though, the business is looking to go global, with plans for partnerships in the US and UK, as well as in the rest of Africa.@pavlobiz @Radio702 staff treated to shoe shine from Elliot for Lere’s Shoe Shine @BDO_SA for the 1st #CEOSleepoutZA pic.twitter.com/wvfFQvTxt7— mich (@michalentweet) May 5, 2015Mgayiya’s business philosophy is simple: passion and clever thinking are more important to entrepreneurs than just money. The business’s customers – be they tourists arriving in South Africa for the first time or seasoned business travellers – always enjoy having someone to talk to. “They enjoy the experience of interacting with (the shoe shiner), (so all my) employees have extrovert personalities“They’re someone to connect with, talk to, when you’re far from home in a hard, cold place like an airport, it’s nice to find a quiet, relaxed space for a chance to stop and relax for a moment and maybe engage meaningfully with someone that you might not have met in any other situation. That’s what this business is really about, everything else will follow if you engage with the client.”Today, Mgayiya has 45 employees and he estimates his company shines the shoes of between 120 000 and 130 000 customers a year.His advice to budding entrepreneurs is to be prepared to commit themselves completely to their business, even if it means facing greater risks. “If you are not invested in that business, it changes the chances of success.”He firmly believes that good businesses are made from good ideas, from your head and heart. “It is the driving force which is generated from the love and passion for those ideas that makes it successful – it is not just the money,” Mgayiya says.“No matter how poor you are, no matter where you come from in life. it is your brain that makes you successful and your heart that drives you.”Source: AFKInsiderlast_img read more

First generation corn borer management in non-Bt corn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest European corn borer (ECB) was once our most important corn insect, but its population has decreased over the past 20 years, likely due to Bt-corn that provides excellent protection. For this and other various reasons, many farms have switched to corn that does not contain Bt proteins to control ECB and other caterpillar pests. Keep in mind that ECB is not an extinct species — we can find ECB still flying around. This year, we have seen ECB feeding in conventional corn.ECB has two generations per year. Currently, we are seeing larval feeding on the leaves and in the whorl. Soon, and if not already, these larvae will tunnel through the stalk where they will usually continue to feed and pupate. Adults will emerge in late July-early August.Growers of conventional corn should inspect their fields for the characteristic shot hole damage (see figure). If found, you may see larvae feeding in the whorl—you may need to pull the whorl out of a couple of damaged plants to check. Although challenging, larvae in the whorl that are in the third instar or less (usually no bigger than half an inch) are still vulnerable to insecticide application.If the larvae are not in the whorl, they may have died, or worse, tunneled in the stalk. Look for the appearance of sawdust like frass, which ECB larvae leave on the outside while tunneling. Once they bore into the stalk, then control is difficult, if not impossible.As a guide, we recommend treatment for first generation ECB when 75%  to 80% of the corn shows shot hole damage, and that larvae can be seen in the whorl (i.e. have not bored into the stalk). There are many chemicals that can control ECB (see our bulletin: https://agcrops.osu.edu/publications/control-insect-pests-field-crops-bulletin-545), although granular forms tend to be more effective than liquid.last_img read more

FAA Pondering Gate-To-Gate Policy For Gadgets On Airplanes

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#smartphones#tablets dan rowinski Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Soon, you may not have to stow that gadget when you’re on an airplane waiting to take off. A forthcoming report from a Federal Aviation Administration working group will likely recommend lifting the ban on the use of electronic devices during takeoff and landing.According to The Wall Street Journal, the report will recommend the allowance of “gate to gate” gadget use, meaning you won’t have to pack away that book you are reading on your iPad or Kindle after you have taken your seat on an airplane. This will be a massive departure from almost the last 50 years of FAA policy that banned the use of electronic devices on flights fearing that emissions from the devices would play havoc with airplanes navigation instruments.The report will specifically address the use of devices in low-altitude situations (below 10,000 feet) and recommend that they be used in “airplane mode.” Cellular phone calls will still likely be prohibited during take off and landing.Gadgets are much different now than when the policy was created in 1966. The emissions from devices’ internal components are drastically less then they used to be – even from five to ten years ago – and wireless transmissions are now confined to defined, narrow spectrums.The report will likely recommend three types of gadget regulations in place of the current ban during takeoff and landing based on the type and age of the aircraft and how well it has met certain regulations. Older aircraft with limited protections will continue with a similar pre-flight announcement that flyers are used to hearing, telling them when it is OK to switch on their devices. On the other end of the spectrum, planes that have met all safety regulations will announce that, “This aircraft tolerates emissions from electrical devices for all phases of flight.” Other planes will allow gate-to-gate use of gadgets unless specifically told not to do so by the flight crew.The report will urge the FAA to set standards that new planes be able to handle most, if not all, gadget use by 2015.Top image courtesy Shutterstock.last_img read more

New roadblock for Manipur varsity

first_imgTribal students’ bodies have given a highway blockade twist to the Manipur University crisis.Three organisations have threatened to impose a five-day economic blockade on all national highways connecting State capital Imphal if the authorities concerned cannot let normal classes and other academic activities in Manipur University resume by October 8.Separate university These organisations have also demanded a separate Hill Central University to ensure that the tribal students have an alternative to the disruption-prone university in the non-tribal dominated Imphal Valley.The All Tribal Students’ Union, Manipur, the Kuki Students’ Organisation-General Headquarters and the All Naga Students’ Association, Manipur, had on October 2 served a seven-day ultimatum to the University authorities to resume classes. The decision to go for a highway blockade was taken at their meeting on Thursday.Manipur depends on two arterial highways – one via Nagaland capital Kohima and the other via Jiribam on the Assam-Manipur border – for supply of essential commodities. A third highway through Mizoram is relatively less used.These highways pass through areas dominated by the Nagas and the Kuki-Zomi tribes, and blocking them has been a popular mode of protest against the allegedly partisan Manipur government.At their meeting on Thursday, the ATSUM, KSO-GHQ and ANSAM said they were “anguished by the premeditated holding of the career of students to ransom because of the agenda of a few individuals with vested interests in Manipur University”.‘Facing hardships’The three organisations said that tribal students face hardship every year. “We want a Hill Central University so that all the colleges in the hill districts can be affiliated to it and be assured of ideal academic atmosphere,” a joint statement said.The tribal students have stayed away from the agitation by organisations of Manipur University’s students, teachers and staff since July against alleged financial and administrative irregularities by Vice-Chancellor Adya Prasad Pandey. The Ministry of Human Resources Development had made him go on leave till a two-member probe committee submits a report on the allegations against him, but the university continues to burn. On September 20 midnight, police and paramilitary forces raided the campus and rounded up 89 students and six teachers for allegedly manhandling Pro-Vice-Chancellor K. Yugindro. Based on his FIR that the students and teachers had tried to kill him, the police arrested nine students and six teachers.last_img read more

Revoking of Article 370 | Move triggers fears in the northeastern region

first_imgThe Centre’s move to revoke Article 370 has triggered apprehensions in the northeastern States enjoying similar constitutional safeguards. The Constitution bestows special provisions under Article 371A for Nagaland, Article 371B for Assam, Article 371C for Manipur, Article 371F for Sikkim and Article 371F for Mizoram.Former Mizoram Chief Minister Lal Thanhawla said the move by the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance was a “red alert” for the people of the northeast.“It has become a threat to States like Mizoram, Nagaland and Arunachal which are protected by the Constitution. If 35A and 370 are repealed, Article 371G safeguarding the interests and existence of lesser tribals of Mizoram will be under severe threat,” he said.Also Read A snapshot of Article 371  The Mizo National Front government chose to adopt a “wait and watch” policy but NGOs such as the influential Young Mizo Association — which has spearheaded a movement against the Centre’s bid to push the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill — said any move to “tamper with” Article 371G would be opposed to the hilt.The Neiphiu Rio-led coalition government in Nagaland, in which BJP is a partner, chose not to react. Neither did the Naga Students’ Federation.‘Minorities undermined’“This is something undermining the minorities in India. I think this is very undemocratic. People in Nagaland would be particularly worried as a settlement of the Naga political process is long overdue,” said Chuba Ozukum, president of Naga Hoho, apex body of all Naga tribes. The “political process” is a term used for the peace talks between New Delhi and the Isak-Muivah faction of the extremist National Socialist Council of Nagaland that fought a secessionist battle with the armed forces until declaring a truce in July 1997.last_img read more

PH Volcanoes off to hot start in SEA Games

Filed under: xgvjeaaa — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:26 pm November 30, 2019

first_imgLATEST STORIES KUALA LUMPUR — As expected the Philippine men’s rugby 7s team opened up with an explosive start after scoring two easy wins in the Southeast Asian Games Saturday at Majlis Bandaraya Petaling Jaya Stadium, Kelana Jaya here.Champions in the sport’s maiden staging in 2015 Singapore edition, the Volcanoes drubbed Indonesia, 47-5, before demolishing Cambodia, 47-7.ADVERTISEMENT Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village They are to face Malaysia late Saturday before taking on Singapore and Thailand on Sunday in a bid to once again sweep the competition all the way to the gold medal.Last year’s bronze medalist Lady Volcanoes weren’t as lucky as they bowed to Thailand, 32-0, in the opening match of the women’s division.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief McIlroy confirms he’ll return for FedEx Cup opener UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss Read Next MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

Older Posts »