Mata urges footballers to do more to tackle coronavirus

first_img Mata, who was an original member of Common Goal, a charity set up to encourage footballers to donate 1 per cent of their salary to support initiatives, has urged fellow professionals to do more to help tackle the crisis. While many footballers and former professionals around the world, including Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp, United legend Eric Cantona and United Women’s manager Casey Stoney, have signed up since the charity launched in 2017 no United first-team player has committed aside from Mata. And the Spaniard has called on his team-mates and players across the world to do what they can in the current Covid-19 pandemic. “It’s been heartening to see many positive responses from players and other football leaders to the current crisis, but it can be also hard to know what to do to help effectively those who need it most,” said Mata.Advertisement “We are suffering a stark reminder of how interdependent we all are. To overcome coronavirus, and the other challenges facing humanity, we need to coordinate individual efforts and work together as a team. “I’m urging not only my Common Goal team-mates, but also all other players and football leaders from around the world to unite and help tackle this crisis, and at the same time use this as a catalyst to play a key role in tackling the other challenges humanity faces. Together we can beat this.” Common Goal announced they have set up the Covid-19 Response Fund to help tackle the immediate effects of the pandemic, and ensure support continues beyond the initial response, with a focus on young people in deprived communities. Mata will also be taking part in a Live Match on Instagram where players are being asked to commit the 90 minutes they are no longer spending playing football to interact with fans to encourage others to donate and share experiences of what they have been doing through the crisis. read also:Mata mocks Matic over training regime during lockdown While no members of the United first team have signed up to Common Goal, a number of them have donated to charities in their own way during the pandemic. Marcus Rashford has helped to raise hundreds of thousands of pounds to ensure children still get free school meals while David de Gea made a sizeable donation to the coronavirus fund in Spain. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Manchester United midfielder, Juan Mata, has urged footballers across the world to do more to try and help with the fight against coronavirus.center_img Loading…last_img read more

Joshua Wants Rematch with Ruiz in Cardiff to Get Passion Back

first_imgAnthony Joshua has said that he is determined to get his “passion” back for boxing ahead of his rematch with Andy Ruiz Jr later this year.The British heavyweight lost his WBA, IBF and WBO world titles with a shock defeat by Ruiz on 1 June.That was the first professional loss of Joshua’s career and the 29-year-old is desperate to prove it was a one off. “I feel strong enough and I feel I can correct my wrongs,” Joshua told Sky Sports.“I need to be around as many boxing people as possible because right now I need to soak in the experience and knowledge – and get that passion back.”Joshua’s first bout with Ruiz took place at Madison Square Garden in New York and was the Briton’s first fight in the United States.His promoter wants the rematch to take place in Cardiff at the Principality Stadium, but Ruiz has insisted he does not want to fight in the UK.“It doesn’t matter to me where it is,” Joshua said.“I would love it to be in Cardiff but it’s going to be on neutral ground, Ruiz is the champ so he will make some calls in that situation but I’m going to battle for it to be in the UK because it’s my stomping ground.“Walking out in Cardiff in front of 70, 80, 90 thousand people screaming and rooting for you to win, that type of energy that goes through your body is unstoppable and I think that could give me the little bit of edge I need to win those belts.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Extra Innings: Challenging penalties is the wrong call for NFL

first_imgIt’s unfair. The call clearly was pass interference — anyone with common sense can see that. It is just unfortunate that in that moment, the officiating crew lacked common sense. However, slowing the game down and staring at negligible details for a couple minutes often cause officials to second guess themselves in these grey zone areas. They were trained for years to make the right call on the field. Some things should not be reviewed and especially should not be challenged by coaches. There are bullet points that  help define this rule in Section 5 Article 2 of the NFL Rulebook, but that will never be enough to eliminate the gray area left by the imperfect rules. I expect to see some long reviews on pass interference calls. I expect to see Pereira attempt to define the ambiguous grey zone. And I expect to see tweets from furious fans about a play standing or being overturned. As a result, all 32 NFL head coaches voted unanimously to extend the replay rule to allow for pass interference calls to be challenged by coaches and reviewed in New York in the last two minutes of each half. The horrific image of Los Angeles Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman obliterating New Orleans Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis in the 2018 NFC Championship game may never leave Saints fans’ minds. However, a new rule that will be implemented in the 2019 season may prevent fans from ever having to go through that emotional distress again. This is a big step for the NFL, which hasn’t allowed coaches to challenge penalties in the past. It will surely allow the NFL to make better calls in some instances. However, the negative ramifications of the newly implemented rule far outweigh its benefits. Take the catch rule, for example. Each year, the NFL tries to redefine what is considered a “catch.” The player must make a football move, secure control and clear possession. The same goes for pass interference calls. The 2018 NFL rulebook defines pass interference as “any act by a player more than one yard beyond the line of scrimmage [that] significantly hinders an eligible player’s opportunity to catch the ball.” The thought of hearing these words come out of Mike Pereira’s mouth on Sunday makes me uneasy. There is no definite answer. It is not his fault; there is virtually no way to eliminate the massive gray zone in the catch rules. center_img Sam Arslanian is a sophomore writing about sports. His column, “Extra Innings,” runs Fridays. Undoubtedly, the implementation of this rule will benefit the NFL. It releases the handcuffs that have prevented officials from reviewing penalty calls. Referees are humans, and humans make mistakes, especially in fast-paced environments where they must make snap decisions. It is sensible to think that with the technology available today, officials should have the opportunity to make the correct call through review. Die-hard Saints fans protested the NFL and called out Commissioner Roger Goodell. Two season-ticket holders from “Who-Dat Nation” even filed a lawsuit against the NFL. I would be open to a rule that states NFL coaches can’t challenge penalties, but officials are allowed to review plays for penalties, if they think a call was botched or even New York-initiated reviews. Allowing coaches to challenge calls adds a whole different dimension to the plays that are reviewed. It introduces more plays that can essentially be decided by the flip of a coin. Because of this, replay reviews on potential receptions were some of the NFL’s most controversial plays in recent memory. The missed pass interference call is now known as one of the biggest botched calls in NFL history, right up there with former Lions receiver Calvin Johnson’s “dropped” touchdown reception, which was actually a catch. This play cost the Saints a Super Bowl appearance, and fans will never forget that. A similar argument can be made for balls and strikes in baseball. The umpire calls it on the field, and that’s the way it is. Sometimes, calls are missed. No umpire will ever say they make 100 percent of their calls correctly. Introducing reviews for balls and strikes would be detrimental to the game. Granted, the right call would most likely be made when reviewed — every aspect of a sport cannot be perfect.last_img read more