HOTT FM Donates Modern Latrine to Kpallah Community

first_imgThe management of HOTT FM 107.9 radio station has over the years tried to identify with its fans across Liberia. On several occasions, the station has single-handily donated food, school supplies, hygienic supplies and other necessities to the needy.Lately, HOTT FM’s CEO Bernard Benson (a.k.a. DJ Blue) and staff have again over the week helped those in need by listening to their cry. “We have played a major role in making sure we sanitize people about the dangers of Ebola. And we were also responsible for the ‘Ebola is real’ song that made the whole world realize that Ebola is real,” stated DJ Blue.Members of the Kpallah community, Brewerville, outside of Monrovia, appealed to HOTT FM ’s management that a toilet was urgently needed.In response to the request, HOTT FM dedicated a modern four-stall latrine.“We see it necessary to help, especially when a person is in need,” Blue said. “The dedication also shows what a community that is together can achieve collectively. As a small Liberian business, this gesture signifies our strength and also the passion we have for communities.”DJ Blue called the gesture “amazing”, not because the project cost the station $7,500.00 USD, but because “this is the first time in history that a small business (radio station) owned by young Liberians has embarked on a sustainable project with such magnitude”, he added.“HOTT FM has reached out to numerous orphanages and communities, and we have legal documents to prove all. Long before the Ebola outbreak, we identified with WestPoint by feeding them and giving them packages of goodies for a whole day,” DJ Blue added.Meanwhile, the Kpallah community was engaged when DJ Blue was fortunate to meet its community leader Alahaji Seator. He says he was astonished at the fact that community dwellers didn’t have a proper place to ease themselves.“Grandmothers, mothers, children, women and the whole community are using the bushes to ease themselves,” DJ Blue recalls.  “And being a well meaning citizen with heart and love for his/her community, especially with the position to help, such a thing can’t be ignored.”HOTT FM is also known for throwing big bashes, concerts and entertaining events. According to DJ Blue, HOTT FM held a series of events to raise money for the latrine project.“The project cost $7,500.00. No one heeded their call, so we decided to take the bull by the horns. We are proud to say this modern latrine was one hundred percent funded by HOTT FM 107.9. I hope other institutions will imitate what HOTT FM is doing and has done,” DJ Blue urged.For the meantime, the community leader Alahaji Seator extolled HOTT FM for dedicating the modern latrine to his community and its people.“People who carry on initiatives in communities are normally politicians. But to see a private business institution erecting a modern latrine in my community brings me joy. I urge the community to use the latrine properly so that it will last longer for the good of the community and its people,” said Seator.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

America’s kids sleep-deprived

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) – America is raising a nation of sleep-deprived kids, with only 20 percent getting the recommended nine hours of shuteye on school nights and more than one in four reporting dozing off in class. Many are arriving late to school because of oversleeping and others are driving drowsy, according to a poll released Tuesday by the National Sleep Foundation. “In the competition between the natural tendency to stay up late and early school start times, a teen’s sleep is what loses out,” said Jodi A. Mindell of St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “Sending students to school without enough sleep is like sending them to school without breakfast. Sleep serves not only a restorative function for adolescents’ bodies and brains, but it is also a key time when they process what they’ve learned during the day.” said Mindell, associate director of the Sleep Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. School-age children and teenagers should get at least nine hours of sleep a day, according to the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health. The poll found that sixth-graders were sleeping an average of 8.4 hours on school nights and 12th-graders just 6.9 hours. Without enough sleep, a person has trouble focusing and responding quickly, according to NIH. The agency said there is growing evidence linking a chronic lack of sleep with an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and infections. The poll, taken in November, interviewed 1,602 adult caregivers and their children age 11 to 17. It had a margin of error of 2.4 percentage points. Among the findings: -Some 28 percent of high-school students said they fell asleep in class at least once a week. In addition, 22 percent dozed off doing homework and 14 percent arrive late or miss school because they oversleep. -Some 51 percent of adolescent drivers have been on the road while drowsy in the past year. -Four-fifths of students who get the recommended amount of sleep are achieving As and Bs in school; those who get less sleep are more likely to get lower grades. -Some 28 percent of adolescents say they are too tired to exercise. -Just 20 percent of adolescents said they get nine hours of sleep on school nights and 45 percent reported sleeping less than eight hours. “We call on parents, educators and teenagers themselves to take an active role in making sleep a priority,” said Richard L. Gelula, the foundation’s chief executive officer. Nearly all youngsters – 97 percent – have at least one electronic item in their bedroom. These include television, computer, phone or music devices. Adolescents with four or more such items in their bedrooms are much more likely than their peers to get an insufficient amount of sleep at night and almost twice as likely to fall asleep in school and while doing homework, the foundation reported. According to the NIH, sleep needs vary from person to person and change throughout life. For example, newborns sleep 16 hours to 18 hours a day; children in preschool sleep between 10 hours and 12 hours a day; school-age children and teenagers should get at least nine hours of sleep a day. Adults should get seven hours to eight hours of sleep each day. The foundation describes itself as an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public health and safety by studying sleep and sleep disorders. It is funded by memberships, sales of educational materials, advertising, investment income, individual donations, subscriptions, and educational grants from foundations, federal agencies and corporations, including pharmaceutical companies. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more