Bong Teams are DonamiSports/YMCA Challenge Champions

first_imgMr. Toe presents the winners trophy to the skipper of the U-12Two youth teams in Gbarnga, Bong County have won the DonamiSports/YMCA Cities Challenge Cup competitions.Bong County’s U-12 team defeated New Kru Town U-12 1-0 and their U-14 team defeated Clara Town All Stars U-14 2-1.Both losers were the winners of the previous tournament held in Monrovia. The new winners will travel to Monrovia to meet their counterparts at the ELWA Community in a date to be announced later.The Challenge Cup tournaments are scheduled in the way that the winners also go to the next community to play.The Gbarnga tournament was held at the Catholic Compound and a large crowd of people came to see the youngsters play their game.The organizers, DonamiSports and YMCA, had representatives at the game. The winners from Gbarnga lifted two giant-size trophies and the losers also received consolation trophies.One of the New Kru Town U-12 players during the presentation of the trophies broke down and wept for his team’s loss, while the Gbarnga boys went into jubilation, singing, “That’s how we do it here.”Both winners showed great skill on the field and it was clear that they were prepared to win their matches. And as every game must have a winner, the Gbarnga boys won their games and are now new champions.The two teams in a future date will come to Monrovia to play against two teams in ELWA Community to continue with the process and the winners will continue to another county to continue the challenge.Before presenting the trophies to the two skippers of the winners, DonamiSports’ coordinator Josiah Toe informed the kids of the great passion that DonamiSports’ president Doc Lawson has for the development of their talents with the hope that they could become superstars for Liberia.“Doc Lawson wants you to become great players like he was as a young player in America,” he told the kids as they cheered.“The teams that you beat,” Mr. Toe said, “also beat other teams. Being and playing together show that we can continue to play across the country as we identify talented youths for Liberia.”He urged them to continue to play with their passion and work along with DonamiSports/YMCA to expose their talents.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

DeBoer puts Sharks forward on alert as team gets healthy

first_imgSAN JOSE — Sharks coach Pete DeBoer is putting Joonas Donskoi on alert: get your game in shape or you could be the odd man out.With Evander Kane’s return to practice on Wednesday, the Sharks forward group is on the verge of being fully healthy for the first time since they acquired Gus Nyquist at the trade deadline last week. As a result, someone will be getting bumped from the lineup in the near future, and at this point, Donskoi is a leading candidate, struggling through another cold stretch …last_img

Another Rotary Machine Found in Bacteria

first_imgA molecular “garbage disposer” in the cell membrane bearing some resemblance to the rotating motor ATP synthase has been described in Nature.1  This machine, called AcrB, expels toxins from the cytoplasm through the cell membrane to the outside.  Like ATP synthase, it has three active sites at one end where the binding occurs, and it operates on proton motive force; but unlike the former, it performs “functional rotation” instead of mechanical rotation.    Murukami et al., a team of five in Japan, described the machine in the 14 Sept issue of Nature.1  Here is a simplified picture of how it works.  Picture a pie with three slices and follow a toxin from the inside of the cell, through the AcrB disposer, to the outside.  One of the slices has a port open and ready for use; we follow the molecule inside as it gets dragged in because of the proton flow.  A trap door lets us into the first chamber then snaps shut.  Inside, we are squeezed into another chamber, then into a tunnel, then handed off to a membrane protein that ejects us out to the exterior environment.  The squeezing occurred because the neighboring pie slice opened its port when ours closed.  When the third slice opened in turn, we were ejected into the tunnel.  In this “functional rotation” model of the action, each of the three segments cycles through three states, and affects the state of the neighboring segment.  The result is a continuous garbage-disposer like operation that sucks in the toxins, binds them, and ejects them out.  Apparently each segment can handle a wide variety of substrates, and adjacent segments might be working on different molecules simultaneously.    There’s one bad side effect of this technology for us humans.  For doctors trying to administer chemotherapeutic drugs or antibacterial agents, the bacteria put up a challenge; they can be ejecting the drugs as fast as the doctor administers them.  This is one way bacteria gain immunity to drugs.  Finding ways to disable these “ubiquitous membrane proteins” may be easier now that we know how they work.  This particular machine operates in the lab bacterium E. coli, but there are other types of these “multi-drug transporters” (MDTs) in other organisms that work in other ways.  In the same issue of Nature,2 two Swiss researchers described a different MDT in S. aureus called Sav1866.  Instead of proton motive force, this member of the ABC family of MDTs uses ATP to twist the toxin out of the membrane.    In the case of the rotary machine AcrB, both the research team and commentator Shimon Schuldiner (Hebrew U) couldn’t help but notice the resemblance to ATP synthase.  AcrB lacks the mechanical rotation of the gamma subunit, and seems to lack the rotating carousel driven by protons, but it does have three active sites that appear to operate in turn like a rotary engine.  Schuldiner did not explain any details of a relationship, but speculated that AcrB might be a missing link of sorts: “It is possible that this is a remnant of the evolutionary process that led to the development of true rotary molecular machines.”  Other than that, and an offhand remark earlier in the commentary that “MDTs have evolved into many different forms to act on a wide range of xenobiotics” [i.e., alien molecules], the only other reference to evolution in any of these three papers was a speculation about Sav1866 by Dawson and Locher.  Noting the functional similarity but distinctly different architecture between Sav1866 and another member of the ABC family of MDTs, “the bacterial lipid flippase MsbA” in Salmonella, they cannot see an evolutionary relationship between them: “The observed architectures of MsbA and Sav1866 remain incompatible, even when considering that the proteins may have been trapped in distinct states,” they note.  So what is the answer?  How did these structurally different yet functionally similar machines originate?  They leave it at, “the differences—if real—would indicate a convergent evolution of the two proteins.”1Murukami et al., “Crystal structures of a multidrug transporter reveal a functionally rotating mechanism,” Nature 443, 173-179(14 September 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05076.2Dawson and Locher, “Structure of a bacterial multidrug ABC transporter,” Nature 443, 180-185(14 September 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05155.3Shimon Schuldiner, “Structural biology: The ins and outs of drug transport,” NatureIt’s important for us to keep reporting what biophysicists and biochemists are finding, so that the Darwinists know what they are up against.  The cheap calls of “convergent evolution” and “remnants of the evolutionary process” and other such calls to accept evolution as an assumption are ringing hollow, and need to be ejected with the rest of today’s intellectual garbage and toxins.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Moon Water Is Young

first_imgThe water detected on the moon by orbiters can only last thousands of years, not billions.A NASA press release says, “Inside Dark, Polar Moon Craters, Water Not as Invincible as Expected, Scientists Argue.” An animation at the top shows why: meteoroids and the solar wind destroy it.Unlike Earth, with its plush atmosphere, the Moon has no atmosphere to protect its surface. So when the Sun sprays charged particles known as the solar wind into the solar system, some of them bombard the Moon’s surface and kick up water molecules that bounce around to new locations.Likewise, wayward meteoroids constantly smash into the surface and uproot soil mingled with frozen bits of water. Meteoroids can hurtle these soil particles — which are many times smaller than the width of a human hair — as far as 19 miles (30 kilometers) away from the impact site, depending on the size of the meteoroid. The particles can travel so far because the Moon has low gravity and no air to slow things down: “So every time you have one of these impacts, a very thin layer of ice grains is spread across the surface, exposed to the heat of the Sun and to the space environment, and eventually sublimated or lost to other environmental processes,” said Dana Hurley, a planetary scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland.Planetary scientists had thought the moon’s water was “invincible” because it appeared to be locked up in polar craters that are in constant shadow. At those locations, the temperature can be -388° F – the coldest temperatures known in the solar system! The water seemed safe there. A new paper in Geophysical Research Letters challenges that assumption, arguing that constant bombardment moves the water around the moon where it becomes exposed to destructive processes.Earth’s moon from Cassini, 1999 (NASA). Some crater floors at the poles never receive sunlight, so water ice can exist there.Icy H2OLunar water does not exist in pools, obviously. Remote sensing from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and other spacecraft implied that icy water molecules in the cold traps are mixed in with lunar soil as “frost” or combined with minerals. Scientists are unsure how deep the icy deposits go in the craters.Future manned missions to the moon may depend on the availability of water. Since it would be very difficult to retrieve it from the shadowed craters at the poles, the scientists were glad to find that impacts might be scattering the molecules around the moon where they could be retrieved more easily. Exposed to sunlight, though, they could not last long. How old is the water that satellites detected?While it’s important to consider that even in the shadowed craters water is slowly seeping out, it’s possible that water is being added, too, the paper authors note. Icy comets that crash into the Moon, plus the solar wind, could be replenishing it as part of a global water cycle; that’s something scientists are trying to figure out. Additionally, it’s not clear how much water there is. Is it sitting only in the top layer of the Moon’s surface or does it extend deep into the Moon’s crust, scientists wonder?Either way, the topmost layer of polar crater floors is getting reworked over thousands of years, according to calculations by Farrell, Hurley, and their team. Therefore, the faint patches of frost that scientists have detected at the poles using instruments such as LRO’s Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument could be just 2,000 years old, instead of millions or billions of years old as some might expect, Farrell’s team estimated. “We can’t think of these craters as icy dead spots,” he noted.Theory RescueThe article mentions replenishment of the water as a “possible” phenomenon, but admits that nobody knows. Imagining a “global water cycle” on the moon seems like special pleading to keep the moon billions of years old. How often do icy comets come in? Only comets whose icy water molecules reach the cold traps could replenish them. How many billions of lucky comets would be required to keep as much water there as is observed today?The solar wind is more predictable, but once again, any water generated by the process has to reach the cold traps, too – and those cold traps are not “icy dead spots” as previously thought. The shadowed craters are losing their water. Day and night, constantly, meteoroids from tiny to mighty blast the water molecules up and away into sublimation Hades.The Reasonable InferenceIn short, loss processes are confirmed by observation, but additive processes are only speculative. More measurements will be required to determine which processes predominate. Till then, science should go with observation. Scientists can no longer assume that the water is safe from destruction in the shadowed craters. The reasonably-known destruction rates support a young moon.Did you notice how the press release tiptoed around the evidence for youth? Any evidence causing problems for billions of years cannot possibly be entertained by secular materialist moyboys, but they have to respect measurable facts. Read the quotes above again, and feel the tension in their predicament.(Visited 430 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Assam man arrested after woman dies of burns

first_imgThe police in eastern Assam’s Bokakhat town have arrested a man on the basis of a woman’s dying declaration that he had sexually assaulted her before setting her on fire.Minutes before the woman died at the Jorhat Medical College Hospital on Wednesday night, she accused one Tirtha Sarma of setting her on fire. She also said the man, a resident of Bokhkhat, had sexually exploited her.Suicide claim But the police on Thursday said that evidence pointed to the woman having committed suicide. “There is nothing in the CCTV footage to suggest the man set her on fire. But he has been arrested on the basis of her dying declaration. We are awaiting the autopsy report,” Manabendra Deb Roy, Golaghat district superintendent of police, said.The woman, an Adivasi in her early 20s, was a domestic help at the residence of Badan Sarma, the father of the accused, for three years. She was dismissed a year ago, the police said.last_img read more