MH370 lost in Southern Indian Ocean

first_imgThe Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Razak announced at 2pm (GMT) that Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 with 239 and passengers and crew aboard ended its flight in the Southern Indian Ocean southwest of Perth, Western Australia.In a sombre and emotion charged announcement Mr Razak said that Immarsat the British based satellite company working with the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch had used new analysis techniques and determined “beyond doubt” that MH370 had been lost and no-one had survived.“Therefore it is with deep sadness and regret that according to new data that MH370 ended its flight in the Southern Indian Ocean,” said Mr Razak.Searches yesterday found more debris thousands of kilometres southwest of Perth which is expected to be confirmed as coming from Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 which disappeared 18 days ago.In a day of high drama, two new debris fields were spotted by Australian and Chinese search planes between 2100km and 2500km south-west of Perth in a zone identified by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority based on US and British intelligence.Earlier Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott told Parliament last night that HMAS Success was in the process of recovering two objects spotted by an RAAF Orion at 11.45am. The crew aboard the Orion reported seeing “grey or green circular object” and an “orange rectangular object”, Mr Abbott said after emerging from a Cabinet meeting.He said the objects identified by the RAAF Orion were separate to the objects reported by the Chinese Ilyushin IL-76.A US Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft attempted to relocate the objects reported by the Chinese plane but were unable to do so.The P-8A, a second RAAF P3 Orion and a Japanese P3 Orion were expected to search their designated search areas until about 8pm last night.The Chinese icebreaker Xue Long is racing to the area where spotters aboard the Chinese IL-76 sighted what they termed “significant suspicious objects”.MH370, with 239 passengers and crew aboard, vanished 16 days ago on a flight from Kula Lumpur to Beijing.A Xinhua correspondent aboard the Ilyushin aircraft reported that searchers saw “two relatively big floating objects with many white smaller ones scattered within a radius of several kilometres”.The Ilyushin was returning to Perth and was at an altitude of 36,000 feet when the debris was spotted. It did not have enough fuel to descend for a closer look.Two Chinese IL-76s joined the search yesterday and departed Perth Airport at 8.45am and 9.20am as Rescue 801 and 802. They returned mid-afternoon.The sighting is 2174km south-west of Perth and in the general area of the Chinese satellite% image taken four days ago.AMSA yesterday launched 10 aircraft to search for MH370.As well as the two Chinese IL-76s, there were two RAAF P3 Orions, three ultra-long range civil jets, the US Navy P-8A Poseidon and two Japanese P3 Orions.MH370 Tribute Pagelast_img read more

Social Networking For Authors & Overcoming The Rejection Slip

first_imgNot a Novel IdeaThere are many other social networks for writers on the Web. So getting new users is going to be nearly as much of a challenge for Moysidis as getting a publisher to notice her debut novel.But according to Moysidis, most of the existing social networks for authors are geared towards helping writers self-publish. Writer’s Bloq is all about helping new writers get the attention of publishing houses. Which begs the question: how will Writer’s Bloq attract publishing industry people to the network?Moysidis replied that Writer’s Bloq is starting out with a focus on writers, but it intends to open up to publishers officially at a later date. In the meantime, she said that industry professionals are already registering… as writers. Many in the industry are budding writers themselves.Like any new social network, Writer’s Bloq has a very tough road ahead of it. The key is to get network effects going, in other words get more and more writers – and ideally publishing industry people too – signed up and using the site regularly. Easier said than done. But Writer’s Bloq has a great design, enthusiastic early users and a Kickstarter project (see video below) to raise money for offline meetups – cleverly called “bloqparties.”Perhaps most importantly, Writer’s Bloq has a passionate, focused founder in Nayia Moysidis. Whose ultimate goal, by the way, is still to get her first novel published. The first thing that struck me about Writer’s Bloq when I signed up for a nosey, was the crisp and clean design. Goodreads could learn a thing or two from that.Writer’s Bloq has two main sections: a writing section and a reading section. As with any social network, it’s advisable to have a look around first before posting your own content. There are many ways you can discover the writing of others – by genre, format, status (published or unpublished), or tags.You can choose to read a piece immediately, or save it for later. You can also send it to your Kindle. The staples of social networks are all there: comments, likes, sharing via Facebook and Twitter, the option to subscribe to the author. What’s In It For WritersWriter’s Bloq is clearly very early in its evolution – there isn’t a huge amount of activity on the site right now. That is of course the problem every new social network has. Goodreads is at the opposite end of the social network spectrum. It’s a mature social network that reached its tipping point a few years ago and is now in the midst of mainstreaming (10 million users and counting!).So the challenge for Writer’s Bloq is to get its core user base – budding writers and people in the publishing industry – to sign up. I asked Nayia Moysidis why new writers should post their work on Writer’s Bloq. Why not just self-publish, if they aren’t able to land a traditional publisher? She replied that when writers submit a manuscript to a publisher, essentially they are after the following three things:Editing and serious feedback on their work.Marketing.Validation.Writers can’t get those things by self-publishing, said Moysidis. The aim of Writer’s Bloq is to give writers a better opportunity to attract publishers. They can promote their work on Writer’s Bloq and get feedback from peers – and perhaps even from publishers sniffing around the site. The community helps self-select the best writing, through ratings and comments. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App richard macmanus Yesterday I reviewed the leading social network for book readers, Goodreads. In the second post in my Social Books series, I’m checking out a brand new social network for book writers. Called Writer’s Bloq, it was founded by a young wannabe writer from New York named Nayia Moysidis. In a phone interview, I discovered that Moysidis, a graduate of Columbia University’s creative writing program, started Writer’s Bloq because of the frustrations she encountered trying to get her first novel noticed by publishers. She’d sent 93 individualized letters to publishing houses, but only received a few generic rejection letters in response.Like many entrepreneurs, Moysidis is a very determined person. After being largely ignored by publishers, her next step was to take an intern job at Simon & Schuster. There she was dismayed to find her very own novel – submitted under a pen name – in the slush pile! On the plus side, Moysidis saw first hand that it was impossible for a publishing house like Simon & Schuster to pick up every book sent to them. They simply receive too many manuscripts.After seeing the writer submission process from the other side, Moysidis concluded that publishers are so overwhelmed that they aren’t discovering enough new talent. She felt that writers needed a better way to try and get noticed, which ultimately would help publishers too. So she created Writer’s Bloq, a wonderfully named social network where writers can post snippets of their work and network with others in the industry. Tags:#Reviews#web 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

Five soldiers trapped under snow in Kashmir

first_imgFive soldiers swept away in heavy snowfall near the frontier posts in Kupwara and Bandipora remained untraced after more than 24 hours on Tuesday, while an Army porter’s body was recovered.“Two soldiers slipped down the slope in the Naugam sector of Kupwara. Three soldiers went missing from a forward post in the Kanzalwan sub-sector of Gurez in Bandipora,” a Srinagar-based Army spokesman, Colonel Rajesh Kalia, told The Hindu.An Army official said an 11-member patrol team of 36 Rashtriya Rifles was on an inter-post movement around 8.30 p.m. on Monday when three jawans slipped into a ravine. The posts are close to the Line of Control in the Bakhtor area, more than 200 km from here, of Gurez.“A specialist team from the High Altitude Warfare School reached the site and started rescue operations, which are still on,” the official said.Two soldiers of a patrol team of an officer and 10 troopers of 20 Dogra fell into a ravine at Naugam around 5 p.m. on Monday. The specialist team was unable to reach the site on Tuesday because of heavy snowfall, officials said. Preliminary reports suggest heavy snowfall, which started on Monday, caused these accidents. Over four feet of snow has accumulated in these areas. Ghulam Qadir Khan, an Army porter from Kilshey village of Tulail, fell to death during snowfall. The body has been recovered.Deputy Commissioner, Bandipora, Sajjad Hussain on Tuesday asked people in the Gurez and Tulail areas not to venture out in avalanche-prone areas till the weather improved.Snow in the plainsThe plains of Kashmir Valley also witnessed the season’s first snow spell in the past 24 hours, badly affecting road connectivity. The national highways connecting Srinagar to Jammu, Leh and Poonch, besides the Mughal-Sinthan Top, Jammu-Doda and Arnas-Mahore highways are closed.“Men with machinery are busy clearing snow for vehicular movement,” said Colonel Awadhesh Singh, Director, Works, Project Beacon, Border Roads Organisation. Sonum Lotus, Director, Meteorological Department, said Kashmir would witness “a gradual improvement in the weather conditions from Wednesday”.last_img read more

Civil society group to form task force to address poverty in Goa

first_imgOver 20 experts, who were part of a round table organised by an NGO on Thursday, decided to form a task force to prepare a roadmap for the State government and create an enabling environment to address issues of livelihood and poverty. Charudutta Panigrahi, mentor at Forum for Integrated Development and Research, said, “This round table brings together the intelligentsia, policy makers, implementers, experts from business, governments and development practitioners to explore the dynamics in livelihood and economic growth of Goa.”The experts included former MLA and Goa EDC chairman Sidharth Kucolinkar, MAIT president Nitin Kukolikar, Advocate Yatish Naik, senior journalist Shashwat Gupta Ray, Sangita Naik of Goa IT Professionals, Soter D’suza of the local self governance movement, Monoj Parab of Revolutionary Goa, and president of DRAG Avelino de Sa.Issues addressed at the round table included data gaps and institutional capacities to make livelihood the central theme of development for future generations. The focus of the meet was to strengthen analytical and institutional capacities to design and implement pro-poor State development strategies. It was also decided to bring about policies in line with sustainable development goals, encouraging gender empowerment and equity in distribution of benefits of growth.The experts felt that in the wake of stagnating and decelerating growth in significant sectors like tourism and mining, there is a need to design interventions to help communities access alternative sources of livelihoods such as IT without compromising the inherent skills and resources of the State’s youth.Mr. Panigrahi said, “The group was concerned about the issue of people migrating in search of a better life, which has been rising steadily in Goa. Some of the ideas shared included initiatives to reduce the rapid migration from rural areas, develop employment strategies and build local capacities.” Siddhartha Behera, director, FIDR, emphasised on the need for a ‘one stop shop forum’ for the State to take forward the livelihood discourse with due representation from the communities.last_img read more

B’desh confident of victory over WI