FAA Pondering Gate-To-Gate Policy For Gadgets On Airplanes

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#smartphones#tablets dan rowinski Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Soon, you may not have to stow that gadget when you’re on an airplane waiting to take off. A forthcoming report from a Federal Aviation Administration working group will likely recommend lifting the ban on the use of electronic devices during takeoff and landing.According to The Wall Street Journal, the report will recommend the allowance of “gate to gate” gadget use, meaning you won’t have to pack away that book you are reading on your iPad or Kindle after you have taken your seat on an airplane. This will be a massive departure from almost the last 50 years of FAA policy that banned the use of electronic devices on flights fearing that emissions from the devices would play havoc with airplanes navigation instruments.The report will specifically address the use of devices in low-altitude situations (below 10,000 feet) and recommend that they be used in “airplane mode.” Cellular phone calls will still likely be prohibited during take off and landing.Gadgets are much different now than when the policy was created in 1966. The emissions from devices’ internal components are drastically less then they used to be – even from five to ten years ago – and wireless transmissions are now confined to defined, narrow spectrums.The report will likely recommend three types of gadget regulations in place of the current ban during takeoff and landing based on the type and age of the aircraft and how well it has met certain regulations. Older aircraft with limited protections will continue with a similar pre-flight announcement that flyers are used to hearing, telling them when it is OK to switch on their devices. On the other end of the spectrum, planes that have met all safety regulations will announce that, “This aircraft tolerates emissions from electrical devices for all phases of flight.” Other planes will allow gate-to-gate use of gadgets unless specifically told not to do so by the flight crew.The report will urge the FAA to set standards that new planes be able to handle most, if not all, gadget use by 2015.Top image courtesy Shutterstock.last_img read more

Winnipeg mayor wants Edmonton Eskimos to change name to a more inclusive

first_imgWINNIPEG – Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman thinks the CFL Edmonton Eskimos should change their team name.“I think there’s an opportunity to have a more inclusive name,” he said. “That’s ultimately a decision for the team, though.”Bowman, who is Metis, said he respects the Edmonton CFL organization but would prefer a different name.The Eskimos said in a statement that it uses the name with “pride and respect.”“At this point in time, we are actively engaged in listening to the conversation that people are having around our name. Those conversations are ongoing and we are keenly listening to all input including from our loyal season seat holders and fans.”The team also said if Bowman has an opinion he’d like to share with it, he should do so.The Eskimos are facing the Blue Bombers in the CFL western semi-final on Saturday in Winnipeg.It’s not the first time there have been calls for the Edmonton team to change its name.Andre Talbot, the retired 2004 Grey Cup champion who played for the Toronto Argonauts but spent his final season in 2010 with Edmonton, said that changing the team name would be a small, but positive gesture.“We have to honour the aboriginal communities of our great country and respect the fact that the name is deemed offensive and oppressive to these communities,” Talbot said in an interview in 2015.“Sports organizations need to be community building organizations. And if we’re isolating and offending part of that community, then our particular organization or league is not doing its job.”Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, which represents Canada’s 60,000 Inuit, said in 2015 that it wasn’t right for any team to be named after an ethnic group.He called the term Eskimo a relic of a past in which Inuit people had no control over their lives or even what they were called. He said he would be offended if someone called him Eskimo.(CTV Edmonton, The Canadian Press)last_img read more